Spotlight on Leonardo da Vinci: The Art of Anatomy with Christina Mifsud

Spotlight on Leonardo da Vinci: The Art of Anatomy with Christina Mifsud


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Only -3 items in stock!
No events are scheduled at this time. Want to be notified when it’s back? Leave your email address and we’ll notify you.
Want to book this event privately? Send us an inquiry.
Something went wrong while submitting your request, please try again later.
Your request has been sent, you'll be notified of future dates.

Our spotlight on Leonardo Da Vinci highlights the artistry and genius of the man’s curious interest in the human body. From questioning why humans cry or laugh to detailed drawings of the human heart, the conversation will examine Leonardo’s interest in understanding the human body in the context of 16th-century anatomical studies. During our time together we will dispel myths surrounding the practice of dissection and Leonardo’s findings – and answer our questions about how, where, and why Leonardo took up this innovative area of study. 

The lecture presents Leonardo Da Vinci as a scientist who was also a master at the “Arte del Disegno.” We will learn how Leonardo approached his curiosities with his own specific methodologies and how he recorded his findings with precision. As the lecture brings to light anatomical studies during the Renaissance, we will place Leonardo’s discoveries and ideas in context. Sadly, Leonardo’s conclusions were never published during his lifetime – but did contribute significantly to major future breakthroughs in anatomy and human health.

Led by Art Historian Christina Mifsud, an expert in the Florentine Renaissance, this interactive seminar explores the context in which Leonardo Da Vinci created his important anatomical drawings today housed in the Royal Collection at Windsor Castle. Designed to inform curiosity as well as future travels, participants will come away with an increased awareness of the relationship of this particular artist to science and encourage reflection on such themes in the world of art and science today.

For more in this series, we invite you to explore:

Christina Mifsud is an adjunct Professor of Art History at Loyola University of Chicago’s John Felice Rome Center and an authorized tour guide for Italy and Vatican City. Christina holds a B.A. in Art History from Santa Clara University where she studied near her native city of San Francisco and later made her home in Florence, Italy where she completed an M.A. in Italian Renaissance Studies with Syracuse University in 1995. Mifsud is an expert storyteller who weaves anecdotes and events into a relatable account of the past while placing masterpieces of art and architecture in context.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
67%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
33%
(1)
0%
(0)
K
Karen (Salinas, US)

Very spirited and interesting discussion. Would recommend any of her courses.

N
Nancy B. (Bellingham, US)
A new appreciation for Leonardo da Vinci

Entertaining, educational, and thought provoking. As a nurse who studied anatomy, physiology, and a lover of art, this class gave me a whole new appreciation of Leonardo da Vinci.

D
Debbie Dardick (New York, US)
Leonardo??

It took 50 minutes until Leonardo was brought up with the Vitruvius Man. Then there was a bit more discussion about him until the end of class. There was considerable Anatomy discussed for the first 50 minutes by other artists. Why was this class listed as Leonardo DaVinci?

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
67%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
33%
(1)
0%
(0)
K
Karen (Salinas, US)

Very spirited and interesting discussion. Would recommend any of her courses.

N
Nancy B. (Bellingham, US)
A new appreciation for Leonardo da Vinci

Entertaining, educational, and thought provoking. As a nurse who studied anatomy, physiology, and a lover of art, this class gave me a whole new appreciation of Leonardo da Vinci.

D
Debbie Dardick (New York, US)
Leonardo??

It took 50 minutes until Leonardo was brought up with the Vitruvius Man. Then there was a bit more discussion about him until the end of class. There was considerable Anatomy discussed for the first 50 minutes by other artists. Why was this class listed as Leonardo DaVinci?