The Russian Revolution's Extremists: Contextualizing the Violence of 1866-1917 with Vadim Malinovsky

The Russian Revolution's Extremists: Contextualizing the Violence of 1866-1917 with Vadim Malinovsky


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Can't make this time? A video recording will be sent to all participants after the seminar.

In April 1866 Dmitri Karakozov had an attempt on the life of the Russian Emperor, Alexander II. He became the first revolutionary to make an attempt on the life of a tsar in the Russian Empire. In 1869 Sergei Nechayev published the book “Catechism of a Revolutionary” that became a manual for the formation of secret societies across Russia. It included the famous passage: "The Revolutionary is a doomed man. He has no private interests, no affairs, sentiments, ties, property nor even a name of his own. His entire being is devoured by one purpose, one thought, one passion - the revolution." The most radical document of its age it became the basis of the revolutionary movement in Russia. 

In this conversation, we will review this era's narrative timeline, beginning from the sudden shot fired by Karakozov in 1866 to July 1918 when the Bolsheviks decided to execute the last emperor. We will dissect the explosion of terrorist activity that took place in the Russian Empire from the years just prior to the turn of the century through the Bolshevik Revolution, a period when over 17,000 people were killed or wounded by revolutionary extremists. 

Led by historian Vadim Malinovsky this seminar will give a deep dive into the history of the most radical Russian organizations and movements of the end of the 19th century and the beginning of the 20th century. Designed to inform curiosity as well as future travels, participants will come away with an increased understanding of the reason why there was a multitude of assassination attempts, bombings, ideologically motivated robberies, incidents of armed assault, and kidnapping that played a primary role in the climax of Russia's revolutionary war. 

Vadim is a historian (MA) who has graduated from Lomonosov Moscow State University. His focus is contemporary Russian history. He is working on a PhD dissertation on Stalin's national policy.

Not suitable for children under age 13 (sensitive content).

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

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S.S. (Oxford, US)
Russian Extremists

I have been interested in Russia ever sicne my father, my husband and I went there in 1961. We had an extensive trip that took us to Odessa, Kiev,Tibilisi Tashkent Samarkand, Buhara and of course Moscow and Leningrad!.I learned a lot and I want to know more

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J.L. (Salt Lake City, US)

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Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
100%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
S
S.S. (Oxford, US)
Russian Extremists

I have been interested in Russia ever sicne my father, my husband and I went there in 1961. We had an extensive trip that took us to Odessa, Kiev,Tibilisi Tashkent Samarkand, Buhara and of course Moscow and Leningrad!.I learned a lot and I want to know more

J
J.L. (Salt Lake City, US)

Guest did not leave comment