The Terrible Power of the Three-Fifths Clause with Richard Bell - Context Travel

The Terrible Power of the Three-Fifths Clause with Richard Bell


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Take a deep dive into the darkest corners of the 1787 federal Constitution and explore the wicked alchemy of the Three-Fifths Clause and its effect on US history before the Civil War.

The original United States Constitution looked both ways. Its preamble announces its purpose to secure “the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity,” an important acknowledgment that liberty is the goal and right of all citizens. Better still, the Bill of Rights, a list of ten amendments added to the Constitution in 1791, recognizes freedom of speech, of the press, of religion, and of petition—four freedoms that would come to serve as major channels for antislavery action and expression in the decades before the Civil War.

Yet, most constitutional scholars regard the 1787 Constitution as being vigorously pro-slavery, something that becomes apparent when we take a long hard look at its infamous Three-Fifths Clause. Far more insidious than is commonly understood, the Three-Fifths Clause wove slaveholder power into the fabric of each of all three branches of government—executive, legislative, and judicial—shaping every aspect of federal policy regarding slavery for decades to come. And it turns out that the Three-Fifths clause was just one of almost a dozen clauses in the original Constitution that affected the relationships of the government of the United States to slavery and the slave trade. Through the chemistry of those other clauses, the many delegates to the 1787 Constitutional Convention who were slaveholders themselves, or who slavery-dependent or slavery-adjacent, worked to prop up and protect that institution. “Considering all circumstances,” one slave-owning delegate later boasted, “we have made the best terms for the security of this species of property it was in our power to make.”

Richard Bell, a history professor at the University of Maryland, explores how such delegates did their work, reconstructs all the contemporary opposition their work generated, and considers the legacy of clauses like Three-Fifths in our post-slavery world.

Richard Bell is Professor of History at the University of Maryland and author of the new book Stolen: Five Free Boys Kidnapped into Slavery and their Astonishing Odyssey Home which is shortlisted for the George Washington Prize and the Harriet Tubman Prize. He has held major research fellowships at Yale, Cambridge, and the Library of Congress and is the recipient of the National Endowment of the Humanities Public Scholar award. He serves as a Trustee of the Maryland Center for History and Culture, as an elected member of the Colonial Society of Massachusetts, and as a fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

This conversation is suitable for all ages

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 13 reviews
77%
(10)
0%
(0)
23%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
J
J.M.C.
3/5s Clause in the US Constitution

Very informative and interactive discussion about the 3/5s clause of the Constitution. I liked being asked to contribute to the discussion.

B
B.B.
Excellent Presentation

Professor Bell made the issues very clear and the history come to life. I like the way we were asked questions and able to participate in the discussion. The audience members were great and asked wonderful, probing questions when the presentation was finished.

K
K.

Richard Bell is a really good teacher. This was a depressing subject, but he made it very interesting. These are the things we really never learned in school.

a
a.
This guy’s a treasure

A brilliant close reading of the constitution regarding the broad consequences of the 3/5 compromise

S
S.b.
Another great discussion on American Histoey from Richard Bell

Bell is very knowledgeable on a wide range of American History. Very detailed explanation of the 3/5 clause, and its significant impact,, that I never realized or even thought about. Fascinating

Customer Reviews

Based on 13 reviews
77%
(10)
0%
(0)
23%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
J
J.M.C.
3/5s Clause in the US Constitution

Very informative and interactive discussion about the 3/5s clause of the Constitution. I liked being asked to contribute to the discussion.

B
B.B.
Excellent Presentation

Professor Bell made the issues very clear and the history come to life. I like the way we were asked questions and able to participate in the discussion. The audience members were great and asked wonderful, probing questions when the presentation was finished.

K
K.

Richard Bell is a really good teacher. This was a depressing subject, but he made it very interesting. These are the things we really never learned in school.

a
a.
This guy’s a treasure

A brilliant close reading of the constitution regarding the broad consequences of the 3/5 compromise

S
S.b.
Another great discussion on American Histoey from Richard Bell

Bell is very knowledgeable on a wide range of American History. Very detailed explanation of the 3/5 clause, and its significant impact,, that I never realized or even thought about. Fascinating