Ancient Roman History – From Cover to Cover: A Seven Part Course with Dr. Alexander Evers

Ancient Roman History – From Cover to Cover: A Seven Part Course with Dr. Alexander Evers


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Roma Aeterna, the Eternal City that sparked an almighty Empire, conjures images of gladiators fighting in the Colosseum, emperors who dominated the Roman Forums, and conquests across Europe. Join us as we explore the story of how one small settlement on the banks of the Tiber River grew into the world’s largest empire.

Founded by Romulus and Remus, it eventually became the capital of the largest empire the world has ever seen. Kings, consuls, and emperors ruled throughout the centuries. The City of Rome quickly became the center of the world. 

From its bustling forums to its most brutal battles, our multi-part course has been designed to survey the Roman Empire’s narrative timeline from its foundation to its fall. Together we will meet illustrious characters from history – such as Scipio, the Gracchi brothers, Sulla, Pompey the Great, and Julius Caesar – who chartered the course of this great republic long ago. Our incredible journey through time and space eventually culminates in the tremendous glory of the Roman Empire: a young man, Octavian, became Augustus - the first emperor of Rome. 

Led by an expert on Roman History and Classical Studies, Alexander Evers, and guided by a mixture of literary and archaeological references, participants in this interactive course will have the opportunity to ask questions and engage in critical discussions about Roman advancements in politics, architecture, religion and more.

Lecture One:  Ab Urbe Condita - The Foundations of Rome

This lecture will be looking at the mythical stories of Rome’s creation and how they tie in with the real history and archaeology of the City. The rule of seven kings, and the early creation of some of Rome's permanent institutions, eventually leads to the end of the monarchy and the beginning of the Roman Republic. Magistrates and assemblies take matters into their own hands. And Rome begins to expand its territory.

Lecture Two: Res Publica - The Development and Expansion of the Roman Republic

The Roman Republic faced a number of socio-political difficulties - on the one hand, they were to be addressed and solved, on the other Republican politicians preferred to ignore them and to distract the Roman people. War and expansion were a perfect way to do so. The time of the Republic saw the great wars against Carthage, which also led to military conflict in Greece and other parts of the Mediterranean. Eventually, these international disputes caused the Republic's decline.

Lecture Three:  Res Publica - The End of the Republic

Personal ambitions, civil wars ... The Roman Republic turned into a real mess towards the end! Political divisions and the use of extreme violence all became part and parcel of Roman public life. Beginning with the Gracchi brothers, and ending with the death of Rome's greatest politician, Julius Caesar, the Republic was doomed!

Lecture Four: Imperium - The Birth of the Empire

With the death of Julius Caesar and the rise of his adopted son Octavian, Rome was transformed into an empire. Octavian was named Augustus by the Senate and People of Rome and effectively held the whole world in his hands. And because the rules of succession made it very clear that power was no longer to be shared, a period of peace and prosperity was initiated - the Pax Augusta!

Lecture Five: Imperium - The Consolidation of the Empire

Augustus' successors made the Empire a success. Examining Roman history for the first two centuries AD, it is quite clear how the consecutive emperors and their entourage controlled their networks of power. At the same time, however, the tremendous level of urbanization and the relative independence of the towns and cities throughout the Roman Empire made it all so easy to rule the world. Together we will unravel the plans these great leaders set in motion. 

Lecture Six: Imperium - Crisis Management

During the third century AD, Rome experienced a period of turbulence - both in time and space. Emperors went after each other's heads, all wanting to sit on the same throne. Wars, both foreign and civil, made life difficult. The economy suffered. Natural disasters struck. Was this the end? No. Emperor Diocletian reinvented the Roman government. And after him, Emperor Constantine "the Great" reinvented it again. After all, the show must go on!

Lecture Seven:  Imperium - Decline and Fall

We've all heard it: Barbarians invaded the Roman Empire and, from there, things crumbled. After Emperor Constantine "the Great" decreed that Christianity would be the dominant religion, it was the beginning of the end. The Roman Empire came to an end in the West in 476 AD, when the last emperor, Romulus Augustulus, was kicked off the throne. In the East, it continued until 1453 AD - in Constantinople. Together we will review the narrative timeline of the empire’s decline and everlasting legacy.

Alexander Evers is an Associate Professor at the John Felice Rome Center of Loyola University Chicago. He obtained his DPhil in Ancient History at the University of Oxford. His research continues to focus on Roman Africa in Late Antiquity. He also directs a multi-disciplinary, international research project on the workings of the Early Church, particularly the relationships between emperors, bishops, and senators. Together with a team of archaeologists and students, Alexander continues to uncover 'his own' Roman villa in Sicily. He is a keen church organist, singer, and soccer player.

How does it work?

This is a seven-part series held weekly and hosted on Zoom. Please check the schedule for the specific dates and times for each lecture. All Context Conversations are advertised in Eastern Standard Time.

When will I receive the Zoom link

Your link to enter the Zoom room will be the same for all ten sessions. It will be sent to the email address used to place your order 30 minutes prior to each lecture's start time.

Is there a reading list in advance?

Though the course is open to participants with no background on this topic, there are suggested readings for further investigation. These will be provided at the course's conclusion.

How long are the lectures?

Each lecture is 90 minutes long with time for Q&A.

How much is the course?

The course is $245 for seven lectures.

Is a recording available?

Yes. All registered participants will be sent a recording link within 48 hours of each session's conclusion.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
67%
(2)
33%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
L
L.S. (Madrid, ES)
It is a pleasure to attend to Dr. Alexander Evers lectures

What I like the most of Dr. Alexander Evers' lectures is the passion and knowledge he always demonstrates. Also, they are easy to follow and he usually adds interesting anecdotes, which makes them even more engaging.
It is a pleasure to attend this course given by a professor who had his PhD at Oxford University.

L
Laura Sánchez (Madrid, ES)
A very interesting and well presented lecture

I'm discovering a new (ancient) world with Dr. Alexander Evers, who makes all his lectures and courses easy to follow and engaging.

J
J.W. (Manassas, US)
First Lecture of Ancient Roman History -- Origins

This was helpful, although at times it felt a bit like a lecture to undergraduates, as opposed to adults interested in the topic. There were some things that were very convoluted to explain (e.g, the legendary ancestry of Anchises, Romulus, and Remus.

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
67%
(2)
33%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
L
L.S. (Madrid, ES)
It is a pleasure to attend to Dr. Alexander Evers lectures

What I like the most of Dr. Alexander Evers' lectures is the passion and knowledge he always demonstrates. Also, they are easy to follow and he usually adds interesting anecdotes, which makes them even more engaging.
It is a pleasure to attend this course given by a professor who had his PhD at Oxford University.

L
Laura Sánchez (Madrid, ES)
A very interesting and well presented lecture

I'm discovering a new (ancient) world with Dr. Alexander Evers, who makes all his lectures and courses easy to follow and engaging.

J
J.W. (Manassas, US)
First Lecture of Ancient Roman History -- Origins

This was helpful, although at times it felt a bit like a lecture to undergraduates, as opposed to adults interested in the topic. There were some things that were very convoluted to explain (e.g, the legendary ancestry of Anchises, Romulus, and Remus.