Cooking Class: Hungarian Paprikash with Nada Zecevic

Cooking Class: Hungarian Paprikash with Nada Zecevic


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When and why did paprikash become so popular? What is the difference between it and Hungary’s other widely known “-ash” recipe, the famous goulash? What does the dish tell us about Hungary’s socio-cultural practices and culinary exchange? 

Together we will explore those answers as we smell, cook and taste a family recipe colored by Hungary’s rich history. In our interactive seminar, we will prepare traditional chicken paprikash as it is served today in many Hungarian homes. Additionally, we will touch upon the recipe’s origin and its evolution over time spent in the kitchens of households nationwide.

To prepare the dish in a “slow” manner of the local family cooks, using seasonal ingredients of the local market, join Nada, a historian of Central Europe and a passionate explorer of the region’s cooking traditions.

- 1.5 lbs boneless chicken thighs [chicken breast can do as well]

- 1-2 onion, diced

- 4 garlic cloves, chopped [garlic powder as a substitute]

- 1 red [or green] bell pepper, diced into 1 inch pieces

- 2 plum tomatoes, diced

- 3 tbls paprika (powder - sweet, or spicy or smoked)

- 1/2 to 2 cups chicken broth or water

- 2 tbls flour

- 1/2 cup sour cream [plain Greek yogurt can also do]

- 2 tbls parsley, chopped

- Sunflower Oil [goose or pork lard or butter can also do]

- Salt and pepper

- 4 cups egg noodles [or: nokedli, noodles, egg pasta, Spaetzls, parboiled rice...]

Dr Nada Zecevic is a historian of Central and Southeast Europe, with research interests covering the region's medieval and early-modern elites, historical migrations, and modern uses and abuses of the past. While she currently teaches at the Goldsmiths University of London, where she also leads the Centre for the Study of the Balkans, Dr. Zecevic does her research in the Hungarian archives, and globally promotes interdisciplinary humanities. Dr. Zecevic is the author of two scholarly monographs, and the co-editor of the upcoming Oxford Handbook of Medieval Central Europe (2020/2021). Herself a dedicated traveller, in her work with the public, Dr Zecevic aims at conveying the historical experiences of space and mobility to the learning needs of the modern contextual travel explorers.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
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K
K.
Strong Desire for Paprikash

Very much enjoyed the class and the history aspect of it. Weird, but I am ready Judith Jones (famous Julia Child editor) book and she mentioned the Hungarian dish as well. The book is several years old now, but it shows the significance of food again and again.

T
T.C.
Hungarian Paprikash

This class was engaging and informative. Not only did we learn about the cooking of the specific dish; we also learned some history of the area and people, origin of the food, variants of spices imported to Hungary, and watching a very clear demonstration of how to prepare this easy dish. Nada was kind, patient, and was in contact with listeners for feedback. It was very interesting and fun!

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
100%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
K
K.
Strong Desire for Paprikash

Very much enjoyed the class and the history aspect of it. Weird, but I am ready Judith Jones (famous Julia Child editor) book and she mentioned the Hungarian dish as well. The book is several years old now, but it shows the significance of food again and again.

T
T.C.
Hungarian Paprikash

This class was engaging and informative. Not only did we learn about the cooking of the specific dish; we also learned some history of the area and people, origin of the food, variants of spices imported to Hungary, and watching a very clear demonstration of how to prepare this easy dish. Nada was kind, patient, and was in contact with listeners for feedback. It was very interesting and fun!