Japanese-American Imprisonment in the USA: A Personal History of World War II with Sam Mihara

Japanese-American Imprisonment in the USA: A Personal History of World War II with Sam Mihara


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Only 98 items in stock!
(2 learners booked)

During World War II, the United States government forced Sam Mihara, age 9, and his family to move from their home in San Francisco to a prison camp in Wyoming for people of Japanese ancestry. The presentation summarizes the Executive Order 9066. Sam describes why military officers in other parts of the country did not remove Japanese, German and Italian families.

At the camp, the barren land became a barbed-wire enclosed city of 12,000 people of Japanese ancestry. Mr. Mihara describes through photos the living and eating facilities, bathrooms, work places, schools and various activities the residents undertook to pass the time. He describes his father becoming blind in the camp and a grandfather who died while imprisoned.

After 3 years in the prison, a U.S. Supreme Court decision resulted in closing the prison camp and Sam and his family returned home to San Francisco. Mr. Mihara outlines the legal actions taken to remedy the government’s errors of judgment in the forced incarceration.

Led by Sam Mihara, a survivor of forced incarceration, this seminar will look at the historical events of World War II through a personal lens. Mr. Mihara has spoken to over 60,000 people across the country and his podcast has reached over 2.5 million listeners. His presentation seeks to share his personal experiences and also educate future generations about this difficult chapter of United States history.

Sam speaks about the issue of imprisonment of undocumented immigrants in the United States in his seminar Imprisonment of Undocumented Immigrants in Today's United States with Sam Mihara

Sam Mihara is a second-generation Japanese American (Nisei) born and raised in San Francisco. When World War II broke out, the U.S. government forced Sam, at age 9, to move to the Heart Mountain, Wyoming prison camp. Conditions at the prison were miserable. After the war ended, the family returned to S.F. where he attended U.C. Berkeley undergraduate and UCLA graduate schools, earning engineering degrees. Sam joined the Boeing Company where he became a rocket scientist and executive on space programs. Following retirement, Sam changed careers - he became a national speaker on the topic of mass imprisonment. Sam speaks to educators and students about his wartime experience. He has spoken to over 60,000 teachers and students in the last few years. Sam was awarded the prestigious Paul Gagnon Prize as the history educator of the year 2018.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
100%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
F
Freddie (Highlands, US)
It is a personal history as Sam told us his real feelings.

It was a sad chapter in our history but we now know the role of the Generals in different parts of the country amid the Anti Asian feelings at that time. I learned a lot.

K
Kris Shapar (Stuttgart, DE)
Compelling

I am very grateful to have had the chance to learn about this inexcusable crime from one of its victims, who presented what happened with clarity and an obvious sense of justice.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
100%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
F
Freddie (Highlands, US)
It is a personal history as Sam told us his real feelings.

It was a sad chapter in our history but we now know the role of the Generals in different parts of the country amid the Anti Asian feelings at that time. I learned a lot.

K
Kris Shapar (Stuttgart, DE)
Compelling

I am very grateful to have had the chance to learn about this inexcusable crime from one of its victims, who presented what happened with clarity and an obvious sense of justice.