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Japonisme–Art Between East and West, Part 2: Painting with Dr. Gavin Campbell

Japonisme–Art Between East and West, Part 2: Painting with Dr. Gavin Campbell


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Can't make this time? A video recording will be sent to all participants after the seminar.

Japanese art exploded on the European art scene in the decades after 1850, sparking a profoundly creative movement called Japonisme. But those ideas didn’t stay in Europe. Western art transformed Japanese art in turn. Japonisme, then, was a long transnational conversation about modern life and the meaning of art. Join Gavin Campbell for a five-part course to explore the artistic connections between East and West.

When Japan opened for trade in the 1850s, artists from London to Prague suddenly encountered artists who saw the world in very different ways. This discovery transformed some of the most important European artists of the 19th century, from Van Gogh and Degas to Cassat and Monet. But Japanese art was so astonishing that its influences radiated out to affect design, architecture, and fashion, too. Yet we often hear very little about the Japanese art world that created these shock waves, or how western interpretations then found their way back to Japan.

This multi-part lecture series will examine Japonisme as a long transnational conversation between two arts cultures. Together we will explore the astonishing artistic creativity of men and women working at the edge of their cultures, feeling their way into the modern world.

Part 2:  Painting
Japonisme’s most profound impact was on a group of radical European painters, eager to find new ways to represent their world. In lecture two, we examine their work, as well as its reverse impact when it landed in Japan.

Gavin received a Ph.D. in history from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, and came to Kyoto in 2001. He is a Ph.D. professor of history at Doshisha University. His teaching and research revolve around Japan's cultural encounters with the West, particularly during the Edo, Meiji, Taisho and early Showa periods (1600-1940), and he has published on the history of foreign tourism and of Protestant missionaries in Japan. To further explore Japan's global cultural encounters, he is currently writing a book on the history of Japanese menswear from the 1600s through the early 20th century. He is also an expert on Kyoto geisha culture and a frequent participant in geisha entertainment.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

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