The Rise of Chinggis Khan and the Mongol Empire with Dr. Timothy May - Context Travel

The Rise of Chinggis Khan and the Mongol Empire with Dr. Timothy May


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Friday, June 25, 2021 at 1:00 PM EDT
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How does a man go from dire poverty and obscurity to become one the greatest conquerors of all time? Join historian Timothy May to discover the fascinating history of Chinggis Khan.

Despite the murder of his father when he was but a child and the subsequent abandonment by his family, Chinggis Khan proceed to become one of the most influential figures in history. Indeed, besides conquering more territory than the Roman Empire or Alexander the Great, the actions of Chinggis Khan still affect the world today.

Chinggis Khan is the title of Temujin (1162-1227), the founder of the Mongol Empire. While his title has been corrupted into Genghis Khan in the west and he has been transformed into the personification of violence and barbarity, Chinggis Khan established an empire and dynasty that ruled most of Eurasia and transformed the world. Chinggis Khan is rightfully considered the founder of Mongolia, but he also initiated societal and military reforms while also promoting global trade and religious tolerance. His deeds were such that after his death in 1227, his life became the stuff of legend and one that still resonates across time. In this seminar, we will explore both the man and the myth of Chinggis Khan and why he was so successful.

Led by an expert on Chinggis Khan and the Mongol Empire, Timothy May, this interactive seminar will examine the life of Chinggis Khan and the rise of the Mongol Empire. Participants will come away with a deeper understanding of why he was such a great leader.

Dr. Timothy May is a specialist on the history of the Mongol Empire and the author and editor of 6 books, over 30 articles and chapters, and numerous other publications. He has also consulted and appeared on several television shows including National Geographic’s Origins: The Journey of Mankind. He is currently the editor of Mongolian Studies: The Journal of the Mongolia Society and is Associate Dean, College of Arts & Letters, University of North Georgia. He holds a Ph.D., History, University of Wisconsin-Madison, an M.A., Central Eurasian Studies, Indiana University, and a B.A., History and Anthropology, The College of William and Mary.

This conversation is suitable for all ages

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
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(2)
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L.U.

Guest did not leave comment

J
J.

Guest did not leave comment

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C.H.

Guest did not leave comment

A
A.
confused listener

I knew very little of Chinggis Khan or the Mongol Empire before this seminar. The lecture was half done before I understood that Temujin was actually Chinggis Khan. There were so many names thrown out and the relationship chart was only onscreen quickly at the beginning. I had a terrible time keeping straight who people were and how they might be related. I was so frustrated that I wanted to leave the lecture midway thru but decided to stick with it in hopes that more clarity would come later. I think Dr. May really knows the subject but this was definitely not a lecture for the average person who is not well-versed in Asian history.

Customer Reviews

Based on 4 reviews
50%
(2)
25%
(1)
25%
(1)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
L
L.U.

Guest did not leave comment

J
J.

Guest did not leave comment

C
C.H.

Guest did not leave comment

A
A.
confused listener

I knew very little of Chinggis Khan or the Mongol Empire before this seminar. The lecture was half done before I understood that Temujin was actually Chinggis Khan. There were so many names thrown out and the relationship chart was only onscreen quickly at the beginning. I had a terrible time keeping straight who people were and how they might be related. I was so frustrated that I wanted to leave the lecture midway thru but decided to stick with it in hopes that more clarity would come later. I think Dr. May really knows the subject but this was definitely not a lecture for the average person who is not well-versed in Asian history.