Repatriation and Ownership of Global Museum Collections with David Gassett

Repatriation and Ownership of Global Museum Collections with David Gassett


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Only 81 items in stock!
No events are scheduled at this time. Want to be notified when it’s back? Leave your email address and we’ll notify you.
Want to book this event privately? Send us an inquiry.
Something went wrong while submitting your request, please try again later.
Your request has been sent, you'll be notified of future dates.

Inspired by recent announcements from major global museums that they will return some of the famous Benin Bronzes, this seminar will explore museum repatriation (the return of items to their county or people of origin), looking at its long history and discussions today.
“These men and women who have been deprived of their cultural heritage, therefore, ask for the return of at least the art treasures which best represent their culture, which they feel are the most vital and whose absence causes them the greatest anguish.” 
 – Amadou-Mahtar M’Bow, UNESCO Director-General, “A plea for the return of an Irreplaceable Cultural Heritage to those who created it” (June 7, 1978)
During our conversation, we will investigate the definition, origin, and goals of the Repatriation Movement, as well as the histories of museums themselves that have led to calls for the repatriation of priceless cultural artifacts. With cases ranging from the Parthenon Marbles at the British Museum to the return of Maori ancestral human remains from Germany and the Benin Bronzes worldwide, we will examine the global reach and impact of repatriation.
Led by David Gassett, a museum professional and scholar of cultural heritage and repatriation, this conversation will introduce participants to arguments both for and against repatriation and attempt to understand the real emotions this topic inspires. Participants will leave understanding not only the deeper context of repatriation in global museums but also how to fully and more even-handedly engage in conversations about collection ownership in their future travels.
To experience this interactive series in more depth, we invite you to explore:

David is a life-long New Yorker with a B.A. in Anthropology and Archaeology from Columbia University and a M.A. in Anthropology and Museum Studies from the George Washington University and the Smithsonian Institution. His academic specialities lie in indigenous and non-Western art, cultural heritage, and progressive museum models. David has worked as an educator in schools and museums and published internationally about museum pedagogy. When not in a museum, he enjoys a good book, skiing, and exploring the history of his Brooklyn neighborhood.

Not suitable for children under age 13 (sensitive content).

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 6 reviews
100%
(6)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
N
Nancy (Orlando, US)
Thought provoking and stimulating

This was a very stimulating presentation which I thoroughly enjoyed and found thought provoking.

C
Cynthia Futter (Santa Monica, US)
One of my favorites of all the Context tours I have taken!

This tour and lecture were amazing. It touched on things that I had no information or education about, especially related to the connection between the growth of museums and colonialism in the 18th and 19th centuries. I would highly recommend this to anyone who’s interested in repatriation and how the world begins to address some of the historical facts that left many people and cultures damaged.

D
Don Boroughs (Washington, US)
Interesting and well-prepared

In one hour, plus question time, Gassett managed to cover the gamut of the history of repatriations, from ancient times to this year, and across all continents. I came to understand a lot about museums that I never knew and hadn’t thought of before. He has his perspective, but was careful to explain both sides of any controversies. A good mix of photos, artifacts, video, and text.

J
Jacqueline hackel (Oakland, US)
Looting and Plunder collide with Ethics and Culture

Anthropologist David Gassett presented a wonderful multi-faceted lecture which asked the audience to consider the history of museums and the organization of their holdings, cultural and philosophical attitudes toward art objects in time of occupation or war, and finally the long & sad history of reparations of objects taken from their homeland. He offered 3 examples : The Parthenon (NOT Elgin)Marbles, The Benin bronzes and Ivory objects, and the case of the Teikweidi Totem Pole.
The talk was thoughtful and well organized with excellent visuals....all in all I want to hear more from this speaker !

A
Anonymous (Porto Alegre, BR)

Guest did not leave comment

Customer Reviews

Based on 6 reviews
100%
(6)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
N
Nancy (Orlando, US)
Thought provoking and stimulating

This was a very stimulating presentation which I thoroughly enjoyed and found thought provoking.

C
Cynthia Futter (Santa Monica, US)
One of my favorites of all the Context tours I have taken!

This tour and lecture were amazing. It touched on things that I had no information or education about, especially related to the connection between the growth of museums and colonialism in the 18th and 19th centuries. I would highly recommend this to anyone who’s interested in repatriation and how the world begins to address some of the historical facts that left many people and cultures damaged.

D
Don Boroughs (Washington, US)
Interesting and well-prepared

In one hour, plus question time, Gassett managed to cover the gamut of the history of repatriations, from ancient times to this year, and across all continents. I came to understand a lot about museums that I never knew and hadn’t thought of before. He has his perspective, but was careful to explain both sides of any controversies. A good mix of photos, artifacts, video, and text.

J
Jacqueline hackel (Oakland, US)
Looting and Plunder collide with Ethics and Culture

Anthropologist David Gassett presented a wonderful multi-faceted lecture which asked the audience to consider the history of museums and the organization of their holdings, cultural and philosophical attitudes toward art objects in time of occupation or war, and finally the long & sad history of reparations of objects taken from their homeland. He offered 3 examples : The Parthenon (NOT Elgin)Marbles, The Benin bronzes and Ivory objects, and the case of the Teikweidi Totem Pole.
The talk was thoughtful and well organized with excellent visuals....all in all I want to hear more from this speaker !

A
Anonymous (Porto Alegre, BR)

Guest did not leave comment