Russia's Fabergé Eggs: Easter Gifts of the Tsars with Vladimir Ivanov

Russia's Fabergé Eggs: Easter Gifts of the Tsars with Vladimir Ivanov


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Only 93 items in stock!
(7 learners booked)

Fifty-two Easter eggs, produced in St Petersburg between 1885 and 1917 by the “goldsmith to the Imperial Crown” Carl Fabergé, are among the most outstanding (and expensive) works of jewelry ever produced in Europe. They are more than art and more than craftsmanship: each egg tells us a story from the private life of the Russian Royal Family on the eve of the fall of their Empire.
This Conversation will examine the masterpieces of Fabergé from both the collection of the Moscow Kremlin and that of Malcolm Forbes (which was recently sold to the Fabergé Museum in St Petersburg). We’ll discover how an unexpected gift of Tsar Alexander III to his wife Maria Feodorovna gave origin to the tradition of the annual production of elaborately crafted eggs with mechanical surprises inside. By collaborating with the most talented jewelers from all over the country, The House of Fabergé managed to work out their own recognizable style, combining jewelry techniques of old Russia with the latest European trends of the “belle époque” in design and fashion. Although they are part of the Royal lifestyle which no longer exists, they continue to attract worldwide attention through their dignity and elegance.
During our time together, we will discuss the fate of the imperial eggs after the October revolution (when most of them were sold abroad) and myths about the eggs which exist in Western popular culture. Led by local St. Petersburg art historian and author Vladimir Ivanov, this seminar aims to give an overview of the produce of the House of Fabergé. Designed to inform curiosity as well as future travels, participants will come away with an increased understanding of the historical and cultural background of this iconic Russian jewelry.

Holding an MA in Classics, Vladimir is an author of a book called “Inspired by outer space: images of the future in late Soviet architecture” and a key contributor to TASCHEN's edition "CCCP: Cosmic Communist Constructions Photographed". Vladimir has written articles on contemporary art for local media, done podcasts on photography and the Russian revolution. He has also curated a number of exhibitions, including "The Cradle of the Faith: Christian Presence in the Middle East" in New Michael Palace and "Lingua Sacra" in the Imperial Public Library. Currently, he is doing architectural walks in St Petersburg and shares his vast knowledge of arts through the tours of the Hermitage and Russian museums.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 20 reviews
60%
(12)
30%
(6)
0%
(0)
5%
(1)
5%
(1)
B
B.G.
A very interesting talk

This was so interesting and Vladimir Ivanov brought the topic to life and showed us the history and the mysteries of the eggs. A wonderful lecture

N
N.

Guest did not leave comment

A
A.

Guest did not leave comment

A
A.

Guest did not leave comment

P
P.M.
Very well done

Mr Ivanov did a thorough job of analyzing the Faberge’ brand and documenting the lecture with photos and facts. I enjoyed having a Russian speaker. The program seemed to me to be more about Faberge’ than the eggs themselves, but I thoroughly enjoyed it and appreciated the additional reading list. Personally, I would have like to see more eggs.

Customer Reviews

Based on 20 reviews
60%
(12)
30%
(6)
0%
(0)
5%
(1)
5%
(1)
B
B.G.
A very interesting talk

This was so interesting and Vladimir Ivanov brought the topic to life and showed us the history and the mysteries of the eggs. A wonderful lecture

N
N.

Guest did not leave comment

A
A.

Guest did not leave comment

A
A.

Guest did not leave comment

P
P.M.
Very well done

Mr Ivanov did a thorough job of analyzing the Faberge’ brand and documenting the lecture with photos and facts. I enjoyed having a Russian speaker. The program seemed to me to be more about Faberge’ than the eggs themselves, but I thoroughly enjoyed it and appreciated the additional reading list. Personally, I would have like to see more eggs.