Medieval Battle of Agincourt: Fought in 1415 with Dr. Clifford Rogers

Medieval Battle of Agincourt: Fought in 1415 with Dr. Clifford Rogers


Regular price $36.50 Save $-36.50
/

Only 100 items in stock!
No events are scheduled at this time. Want to be notified when it’s back? Leave your email address and we’ll notify you.
Want to book this event privately? Send us an inquiry.
Something went wrong while submitting your request, please try again later.
Your request has been sent, you'll be notified of future dates.

Of all the battles of the Middle Ages, Agincourt may be the most famous. It is certainly one of the best documented. It ranks, moreover, as one of the most startling tactical victories of all time: where else in history can we find a full-scale army reckoned the best-equipped of its day, and superior in numbers by five to one, suffering a ruinous defeat? 
Neither Hannibal, nor Marlborough, nor Napoleon, ever overcame such odds. Contemporaries saw an obvious case of divine intervention, and later historians practically agreed the result was beyond human calculation, declaring Henry V’s campaign “the most foolhardy and reckless adventure that ever an unreasoning pietist devised.” Was it that, or was Henry’s march across France a bold but rational stroke of military genius? When the battle came, how did Henry win it—or the French lose it? Were the latter guilty of unmitigated tactical incompetence, as it seems on the surface? What role did the longbow play, given that most of the French who fought were now encased in plate armor, far better protection than the mail still prevalent at Crécy?
Led by an expert on military history, Professor Clifford J. Rogers, this Conversation will tell the tale of the Agincourt campaign and answer those questions and more. Designed to inform curiosity as well as future travels, participants will come away with a solid understanding of an epochal battle, and how close study of one combat can help students of military history understand strategy and tactics in general. 
This conversation has been designed to be enjoyed as part of a series. For more in this multi-part series on medieval warfare, we invite you to explore:

Clifford J. Rogers is one of the world's leading military historians. He specializes in medieval warfare, and has written prize-winning books on English strategy under Edward III and on soldiers' lives in the Middle Ages. His many other books and articles have been honored with prizes from the Royal Historical Society, the Army Historical Foundation, the Society for Military History, and De Re Militari. A gifted teacher as well as a distinguished scholar, Prof. Rogers has received West Point's highest accolade for teaching, the Dean's Annual Award for Career Teaching Excellence. He is also the Senior Editor of the digital West Point History of Warfare and co-Editor of the Journal of Medieval Military History.

This conversation is suitable for all ages.

90 minutes, including a 30 minute Q&A.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
100%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
D
David Weld (Saline, US)
Longbows and Englishmen

This was an excellent series of 3 lectures on key battles in the Hundred Years War between England and France. Dr. Rogers goes relatively deep into the tactics and then discusses the strategic long-term effects of the battles. He explained in the first lecture how some historians downplay the importance of these battles, when in fact they had an important effect on the people of the time, leading to social changes. The English had the advantage of longbows, which were wielded by the lower classes. This was around the time that the House of Commons gained in power.

M
Mary C Cope (Franklin, US)
The Batttle of agincort

Lecture was informative, detailed, interesting and presented in a manner to appeal to more than history nerds.

Customer Reviews

Based on 2 reviews
100%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
D
David Weld (Saline, US)
Longbows and Englishmen

This was an excellent series of 3 lectures on key battles in the Hundred Years War between England and France. Dr. Rogers goes relatively deep into the tactics and then discusses the strategic long-term effects of the battles. He explained in the first lecture how some historians downplay the importance of these battles, when in fact they had an important effect on the people of the time, leading to social changes. The English had the advantage of longbows, which were wielded by the lower classes. This was around the time that the House of Commons gained in power.

M
Mary C Cope (Franklin, US)
The Batttle of agincort

Lecture was informative, detailed, interesting and presented in a manner to appeal to more than history nerds.